Monday, 1 August 2016

#56 THE CRAMPS - Ohio Demos (Flac)

The Cramps - Ohio Demos 3 X 7" EP


 Studio outtakes, Akron 1979
Sound quality: A-
Vinyl: EX+ > VG+
Rega Planar 2 > cd-recorder > EAC > Soundforge > FLAC

01. Twist & Shout
02. All Tore Up
03. Mystery Plane
04. TV Set
05. Rockin' Bones
06. What's Behind the Mask?
07. Uranium Rock
08. Under the Wires
09. Teenage Werewolf / Sunglasses After Dark
10. Jungle Hop
11. Mad Daddy

Extra: Voodoo Idol 7" bootleg with Studio outtakes:

12. Human Fly
13. Love Me
14. Voodoo Idol

Here`s a cdr of my all-time fav Cramps boot, Ohio demos 1979, "remastered" from vinyl.
The band and the sound is excellent on these much-booted tracks.


 




  The notes below by an uncredited writer accompany the audio files.
"This collection of crisp, loud and extremely crazed 1979 demos blow clean away any official Cramps release, and that includes “Songs The Lord Taught Us” and “Psychedelic Jungle”.

I’ve gone on record as calling it the greatest bootleg of all time, and now I’ll tell you why.

I own this collection as an LP called “All Tore Up” but it has also been unofficially released as an LP called “Ohio Demos” and a 3x7” box set called the same thing, as well as a CD called “All Tore Up” with a different cover.

Every song is a total raw-assed blast, full of hot fuzz and ultra-reverbed chords, as well as minimalist drumming recorded so up front & alive you’ll swear that Nick Knox was an understated genius (as I do). The lineup includes what are arguably their best set of tunes not called “Human Fly” or “The Way I Walk”; they are:

Teenage Werewolf
Jungle Hop
Mad Daddy
Rockin' Bones
What's Behind The Mask
Sunglasses After Dark
All Tore Up (also known as “I Can’t Hardly Stand It”)
Twist And Shout (essentially what later became “Drug Train”, but with totally different lyrics)
Uranium Rock
Subwire Desire (this was on the “Psychedelic Jungle” LP as “Under The Wires”)
Mystery Plane
T.V. Set.

Everything that was great about 1950s rockabilly was vacuumed up and then owned by The Cramps, and they happened to infuse what was already a wild form with a simultaneous punk rock abandon and a sense of detached cool that made for a pretty goddamn compelling package. You’ll never hear them better than on this collection; the set that came out soon thereafter as “Songs the Lord Taught Us” sounds so thin and lifeless by comparison – and I love that record." 

No comments:

Post a Comment

>